Archive for the 'Bacon' Category

Seared Scallops with Pancetta and Brussels Sprouts

2U0A0097

Click here for a PDF of this recipe without photos.

Continue reading ‘Seared Scallops with Pancetta and Brussels Sprouts’

Pan Roasted Pork Chops with Braised Cabbage

IMG_8358

Click here for a PDF of this recipe without photos

Continue reading ‘Pan Roasted Pork Chops with Braised Cabbage’

Cheese-Stuffed, Bacon-Crusted Shrimp

Click here for a PDF of this recipe without photos.

Continue reading ‘Cheese-Stuffed, Bacon-Crusted Shrimp’

Ragu Napoletano with Fusilli Col Buco

Click here for a PDF of this recipe without photos.

Continue reading ‘Ragu Napoletano with Fusilli Col Buco’

Boulangerie Potatoes

Click here for a PDF of this recipe without photos.

According to Tom Colicchio, there was a time when small towns in France each had a central bakery.  The story goes that after the bread was done baking, the townsfolk would use the still-hot oven to roast their own food.  Meats would be placed on an upper rack and potatoes would be placed below, allowing the drippings from the meat to season them.  This dish is designed to replicate that effect by adding bacon and rich chicken stock to flavor the potatoes.

Continue reading ‘Boulangerie Potatoes’

Roasted Potato Salad with Poblano Mayo

Click here for a PDF of this recipe without photos.

This is the second post from my father-in-law’s birthday dinner.  I enjoyed this dish even more than the steak.  Following the recipe will yield just over a cup of the roast poblano mayo, only half of which is required for the potato salad.  Once you taste it, you’ll realize this is great news for the next few sandwiches you make.  You could make this vegetarian by garnishing with something other than crispy bacon, but I sure wouldn’t recommend it.

Continue reading ‘Roasted Potato Salad with Poblano Mayo’

Shrimp and Grits, Momofuku-style

Click here for a PDF of this recipe without photos.

I’ve written before about how much I like David Chang’s food (see resources page and Bo Ssam post, for example), but it’s worth repeating – the guy is doing wonderful things.  He’s a classically-trained, Korean-American chef who grew up in Virginia, worked in Japan, and lives and works in New York.  He has three restaurants in New York and is unquestionably one of the hottest chefs in America right now.  While it was the significant amount of profanity in his cookbook that first caught my interest, the 100% success rate I’ve had on recipes from the book is the real reason I love it.  This dish basically takes standard low-country shrimp and grits and adds the Japanese touches of bacon dashi and usukuchi.  It’s absolutely worth a try.

Continue reading ‘Shrimp and Grits, Momofuku-style’


Categories

Join 39 other followers