Archive for the 'Soups and Stews' Category

Daube Provencal

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This dish isn’t significantly different than Beef Bourguignon which is my cold-weather, large-group, make-ahead standard, but the orange zest and the extra vegetables are a nice twist on that recipe.  If you make this a day in advance, refrigerate overnight, and reheat (in a low oven) the next day, it will be even better.  In fact, I just finished making this a few minutes ago, took the photo above, and will be refrigerating it overnight so it will be ready to go for tomorrow’s Colts playoff game.

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Tuscan Farro Soup

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Over the last few months, recipes and menu items including farro have been popping up everywhere I look.  I wanted to try cooking with it, and this soup from Tuscany provided the perfect cold-weather dish in which to do so.  Unlike most other grains, the farro is difficult to overcook and won’t get mushy if it simmers a little longer than necessary, making this a quick, easy, forgiving soup.

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Chicken, Sausage, and Shrimp Gumbo

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After reading this blog, my colleague, former boss, and good friend Rhonda Linginfelter offered to share with me the details of her never-before-disclosed Gumbo recipe.  There are as many recipes for gumbo as there are people who make it, but this one really can’t be beat.  This is perfect for a cold winter day – particularly a Sunday during football season.  This makes a ton, so make it for a group or plan to freeze some. Continue reading ‘Chicken, Sausage, and Shrimp Gumbo’

Kale, White Bean, and Sausage Soup

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Slow-Cooker Cassoulet

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By now you may be doubting the authenticity of the recipes on this blog.  Last week, I posted an Irish Stew recipe that didn’t include lamb and now I’m posting a Cassoulet recipe that doesn’t include duck.  In the past, I have made this the more traditional way (using the recipe from Anthony Bourdain’s Les Halles Cookbook) with duck confit, tarbais beans, and pork belly.  It was outstanding and I will likely make it again.  That being said, I was specifically looking for a slow-cooker recipe to make on Christmas Eve.  This was part of a perfect Christmas Eve – get the dish ready in the morning, get the kitchen clean, spend the day with the family, head to church in the evening, and come home to a delicious-smelling house and a hearty meal.

Merry Christmas to all, and to a good night.

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Irish Beef Stew

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Okay, okay, I know that authentic Irish stew is supposed to be made from mutton or lamb, but everyone in my family prefers beef.  This may not be authentic, but it is delicious.  I say below that it can be refrigerated for two or three days, but I should probably say that it *should* be.  This is a dish that improves significantly in the fridge, and is much better on the second day.

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Beef Carbonnade

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This dish is essentially Belgium’s answer to Beef Bourguignon.  Traditionally, it’s made with just beef, beer, and onions, but the extra ingredients in this particular recipe enable a much deeper flavor and thicker consistency which I prefer.  You really need to use some kind of dark beer here (Guinness works well and is easy to find, though a dark Belgian beer adds a nice, authentic flavor) to get the desired result.  This can easily be made a day or two in advance and reheated.

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