Archive for the 'Beef' Category



Julio’s Basics: Lasagna

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The title of this post says it all – this is about as basic a lasagna recipe as you’ll find.  It’s great for a group and makes wonderful leftovers.  It even freezes well.

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Ragu Napoletano with Fusilli Col Buco

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Beef en Cocotte with Caramelized Onions

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Beef Cheeks Braised in Red Wine and Orange Zest

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A colleague of mine, Richard Lucey, introduced this recipe to me.  He had eaten Joues de Boeuf at a restaurant in France and decided to recreate it back home in Ireland.  When he asked his usual butcher if they had beef cheeks, he was asked “you mean for human consumption?” I found it similarly difficult to find them here in Indiana.  If you can’t get beef cheeks, don’t let that stop you from making this recipe – just use chuck (cut into ~8-oz pieces).

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Filet with Red Wine Sauce

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Beef tenderloin is perfectly tender but not very flavorful, so it’s almost always better served with some kind of sauce.  This red wine sauce is a pretty classic preparation.  In Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Julia Child includes a recipe for this dish that also features mushrooms.  The beef needs to rest for a few minutes after coming out of the oven but before serving, providing just the right amount of time to finish the sauce.

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Blowtorch Prime Rib with Horseradish Mustard Sauce

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I’ve wanted to make this prime rib recipe since the day I got the Ad Hoc at Home cookbook.  In order to get the outside nicely caramelized but keep the inside at a nice medium-rare, you start the fat rendering with a blowtorch before putting the roast into a 275-degree oven.  N.B. – that previous sentence said “blowtorch.”

This isn’t the time for one of those little butane-powered things that people use for crème brûlée; get a proper propane torch from the hardware store or borrow one from a plumber.

The sauce recipe is from my friend Tim’s dad, Jim Fox.  (Jim’s crustless quiche recipe was previously featured on this blog.)  Like the prime rib recipe, I’ve wanted to make this for months and have been waiting for an opportunity.  A holiday visit from my sister-in-law seemed like the perfect occasion.  Coincidentally, this weekend also marks Jim’s retirement after serving as District Attorney of San Mateo County, CA for the last 28 years.  (Here’s a nice article about Jim – it even mentions the Horseradish Mustard Sauce.)  Congratulations, Jim.  And thanks again for the recipes.

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Irish Beef Stew

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Okay, okay, I know that authentic Irish stew is supposed to be made from mutton or lamb, but everyone in my family prefers beef.  This may not be authentic, but it is delicious.  I say below that it can be refrigerated for two or three days, but I should probably say that it *should* be.  This is a dish that improves significantly in the fridge, and is much better on the second day.

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Beef Carbonnade

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This dish is essentially Belgium’s answer to Beef Bourguignon.  Traditionally, it’s made with just beef, beer, and onions, but the extra ingredients in this particular recipe enable a much deeper flavor and thicker consistency which I prefer.  You really need to use some kind of dark beer here (Guinness works well and is easy to find, though a dark Belgian beer adds a nice, authentic flavor) to get the desired result.  This can easily be made a day or two in advance and reheated.

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Texas Chili

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This is a pretty classic chili recipe – no beans, no noodles, etc – just well-seasoned, slow-cooked pork and beef.   You could easily add cooked (or canned) beans along with the masa harina in the last few minutes of simmering.

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Bison Shepherd’s Pie

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This is an excellent one-dish meal.  It also has the benefit of being easy to make a day or so in advance, making it perfect for serving during halftime of a football game on a chilly autumn day.

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